teach to the heart

Designing Learning Environments: 4-Part Blog Series (Part II)

Analysis

Completing the Analysis Phase of the ADDIE Model means being able to carry out the rest of the steps successfully. Larson (2014) asserts, “A learner-centered design is said to be the most powerful contribution to effective instruction resulting from a systematic approach” (p. 41). During this phase, it is crucial to write the instructional goals, which clearly define the goals of the training, to conduct the instructional analysis, in which you write out the steps and sub-steps necessary to carry out the goalimgress, to conduct a learner analysis, in which you determine what your learners already know so you know how much you need to teach them, and to write learning objectives, which state what leaners should be able to do by the end of the training (Gardner, 2011, n.p.). Key to this phase is knowing who your learners are because learner profiles can impact everything about training, but most importantly media selection, their attention to your training, the time and pacing of the training, and the strategies you will choose as a designer (Larson, 2014, p. 44). Every learner brings a different level of intelligence, prior knowledge, and motivation to a learning environment (Larson, 2014, p. 52-3). In addition, understanding contexts of instruction are just as important as conducting the learner analysis (Larson, 2014, p. 60). The designer needs to know where the trainees will use the skills learned, where they will learn the skills, how the community sees the training, and how the training is set up theoretically. Organizational culture can also have a huge impact on training (Larson, 2014, p. 75).

Design

The Design Phase of the7987532186_752ccfeec8_o ADDIE Model is all about figuring out what will be assessed as a result of the instruction, choosing a format for the instruction, and choosing the instructional strategies that will deliver the training the best. Larson (2014) explains that as an instructional designer, “Your job in this process is to closely examine the content, identify what’s essential, organize it, and present it in a way that facilitates its review” (p. 92). It is during this phase that a designer limits the scope of instruction to the essentials (Larson, 2014, p. 93). It is also important to consider the visual design of instruction, including the text and images that will be used.

How Analysis & Design Impact Instruction

Having to go through the phases of ADDIE in this course has already made me a better instructional designer and educator. The final project that I am developing for the class is a training that will be delivered to fellow educators. During the analysis and design phases, I concluded that the people receiving this training are mostly under the age of forty and highly technology savvy. Almost all of the learners have a Master’s degree and have experienced using technology in the classroom. I also noted that the group does not enjoy lecture style learning, so I decided that the training would include a lot of learner participation, with the trainer serving as the facilitator. Since I know time is precious to these learners, and many have commitments after school, the training will be focused and purposeful. There is one teacher who is highly resistant to technology, and other teachers who already use Google Forms. Thus, I noted that the training would need to be engaging to a range of learners. This audience will flat out ignore anything they do not feel is immediately useful, so the training will be designed to communicate Google Forms’ utility right away. While leading out on past professional development trainings, I had not used the ADDIE Model, and therefore did not complete the analysis or design phases. As a result, I ended up frustrated that it did not go as planned and my peers were frustrated with the training because it was not geared to them as learners. Overall, I am finding ADDIE useful, but cannot see how I would find the time to use it in its entirety during the school year.

References

Gardner, J. [jclarkgardner]. (2011). The ADDIE analysis phase [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZdv5lrJs4U.

Larson, M. (2014). Streamlined ID : A practical guide to instructional design. New York: Routledge.

Helpful Resources

This video will help you do an instructional analysis on complex content:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yXvjJjR9FU

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Final Project

EDU 623: Designing Learning Environments

imgresThis course introduced me to the theories supporting effective instructional design. Although we learned many models of design, I used ADDIE, the most widely used model, for my final project, a training for staff at my school on Google Forms. I took a constructivist approach in this particular training in order to engage learners and give them an active role in their learning.

My Final Projects

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Embedded:

Downloadable:

Storyboard

Final Paper

Designing Learning Environments: 4-Part Blog Series (Part I)

Part I: ADDIE & Other Models of Instructional Design

This 4-part blog seriehead-70184_640s will document my learning about principles of effective and student-centered instructional design as well as the models currently used in the field. Larson (2014) discusses how the field of instructional design and technology has evolved to emphasize two major components: the use of physical media to relay instruction and support teaching and learning and the use of systematic approaches to “…analyze learning needs, and to design, develop, implement, and evaluate instructional materials to meet those needs” (p. 7). Since instructional design (ID) is systemic, it accounts for all of the systems that impact and are impacted by learners (Larson, 2014, p. 8). Using a systematic approach enables one to become a better instructional designer. Ultimately, there are three ID models that make the most sense in the classroom environment, although others may be used depending on the instruction.

The Industry Standard: ADDIE

ADDIE stands for Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation (Larson, 2014, p. 8). ADDIE begins with the end in mind, focusing on what the learner wilimagesl know or be able to do as a result of learning (Larson, 2014, p. 10). Therefore, the designer plans for formative and summative assessments, which will lead to that end. According to Hanson (2015), the ADDIE model is flexible, common, and adaptable (n.p.). However, although some argue it is iterative, some say it is actually linear. It really depends on how it is implemented. It can also be time consuming and costly to complete all phases effectively in a fast-paced environment.

The Trendy New Kid: SAM

The SAM, or Successive Approximation Model, follows the same steps as ADDIE with different names: Prepare, Design, Develop, and Roll Out (Hanson, 2015, n.p.). However, the steps are done iteratively before moving on to the next phase of the system. This model is repetitive in nature, which means that changes can happen right away. Unlike ADDIE, time and money are saved with SAM because of its repetitive nature and the designer’s ability to anticipate changes and be flexible (Hanson, 2015, n.p.). However, its redundancy may lead to errors as designers become desensitized to the review process and it may waste resources (Hanson, 2015, n.p.). The best component of SAM is the collaboration at the heart of it. The system is not done in isolation, but rather with a team. This ensures that instructional design is effective for all stakeholders.SAM-1

Iterative e-learning development with SAM [Online image]. (2015). Retrieved from http://www.alleninteractions.com/sam-process.

The Trusted Traditional: Gradual Release Model

The Gradual Release Model, or GRM, has some similarities to ADDIE and SAM, but is mostly unique in its design and implementation. The system works as follows: “I do” (focused lesson), “We do” (guided instruction), “You do it together” (collaborative learning), “You do it alone” (independent work) (Hansogrrn, 2015, n.p.). Students will most likely move back and forth between these stages as they learn. While ADDIE and SAM are teacher-centered, with the system being almost hidden from students, the GRM shifts the onus from the teacher to the learners. It accounts for the teaching of mastery, helps students apply their skills, and boosts student confidence in their skills and abilities (Hanson, 2015, n.p.). However, since assessments are chosen ahead of time, they may be inaccurate once learning begins and changes. Also, this model is better with small groups because it takes a lot for the teacher to manage the stages (Hanson, 2015, n.p.).

An Instructional Designer’s Preference

What a designer gets out of these systems depends on how they use them. In my context, the GRM works the best. My school utilizes Kagan Cooperative Learning structures, which this model would address. Also, a focus on the student rather than the teacher will make learning more engaging and give them opportunities to apply their skills. I do a lot of modeling when I teach, which this model also considers. Our new grading system is all about mastering skills and we do not grade participation or effort. This model help educators address student skills in a more objective manner. Finally, the GRM would be the least time consuming, as I already use a similar method in designing instruction. I have learned that it can be damaging to a student if you expect them to do too big of a task on their own right away, but that this model can build up their confidence to tackle tasks on their own. Fisher and Frey (2003) assert, “Too often instructional minutes are wasted when students are given independent writing prompts for which they are unprepared” (p. 404). They go on to say that this model gives educators a way to scaffold instruction so that students are more successful independent learners (Fisher & Frey, 2003, p. 404). If a student needs more of a challenge, they would be able to move through the steps more quickly. However, if this model was not used, and then the teacher had to go back and re-teach, it would waste valuable time. This model has helped me to differentiate and scaffold lessons for all levels of learners.

Overall, there are many models of ID, and designers should use the one that most suits their purpose and helps learners achieve the objectives.

Which model of ID do you prefer in your classroom?

References

Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2003). Writing instruction for struggling adolescent readers: A gradual release model. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 46(5). 396-405. Retrieved from http://eds.a.ebscohost.com/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=27bd4c22-cfbc-4e9a-8157-88f3f32c2f78%40sessionmgr4005&vid=4&hid=4111.

Hanson, S. (2015). Instructional design essentials: Models of ID with Shea Hanson. Retrieved from http://www.lynda.com/Education-Higher-Education-tutorials/Instructional-Design-Essentials-Models-ID/161318-2.html.

Larson, M. B. (2014). Streamlined ID : A practical guide to instructional design. New York: Routledge.

Helpful Resources

This document identifies roles and responsibilities for each stage of the GRM:

http://www.sjboces.org/doc/Gifted/GradualReleaseResponsibilityJan08.pdf

Insightful blog about leaving ADDIE for SAM:

http://www.metrixgroup.com/blog/do-we-really-need-to-leave-addie-for-sam/

 

E-Learning Design for Diverse Learning Environments: Course Reflections

E-learning Fueled by Web 2.0 Technology

My current school is on the cutting edge of technology, and we have had a one to one laptop ratio since the day we opened five years ago. Many teachers are taking advantage of e-learning through flipped classroom modules, cloud computing, and social media platforms. However, many educators still default to traditional methods for a multitude of reasons—they are afraid to try something new, they do not want to re-create the wheel, effective e-learning design takes an exorbitant amount of time, etc. Wankel and Blessinger (2013) posit, “Whereas Web 1.0 is considered a content-centric paradigm, Web 2.0 is considered a social-centric paradigm” (p. 3). Social technologies foster critical and collaborative thinking and also a sense of belonging and group cohesiveness (Wankel & Blessinger, 2013, p. 6). While I agree with the authors, it takes training and expertise on the part of the instructional designer to create e-learning that achieves this level of collaboration.images

The influx of Web 2.0 technologies such as blogs, wikis, and social networking sites, has certainly changed and will continue to change the way instruction is designed and have a direct impact on instructional designers, teachers, and students. Instructional designers will be able to access many more resources and make learning more engaging for students. They can utilize social bookmarking so that they can organize websites and resources online and share them with others (yearn2learn4ever, 2011). Teachers will also be able to share resources with others and collaborate with people across the globe. They will be able to connect with parents more effectively and have information on their students in real time (yearn2learn4ever, 2011). Students will be more engaged because the technology in the classroom is an extension of the technology they use in their everyday lives. Their attention will be captured by all the design elements of Web 2.0, such as color, video, etc. Web 2.0 taps into multiple learning styles and students can ask questions at any time. The most empowering aspect of it is that students are the content creators, thus giving them a choice and voice in their learning. Although Web 2.0 will make learning better for all groups, there are real concerns about privacy. Schools need to protect the privacy of their students and teachers. It will be difficult to create a system to do so because the Internet is vast. Also, all three groups need access to the latest technology so that they can realize Web 2.0’s full potential.

Accessibility as a Human Right

The most iimgresmportant issue in the world of instructional design for e-learning is accessibility. There are still people with limited access to the Internet, which puts them at a disadvantage. Holmes and Gardner (2006) assert, “It is essential for the economic prosperity of the individual and society, and for the social cohesion that sustains it, to have the facility to acquire knowledge when it is needed and in a form that meets the purpose for which it was sought” (p. 51). Thus, society has an obligation to ensure that all people have access to information, 21st century skills, e-learning resources, lifelong learning opportunities, and Internet resources that meet various needs and interests (Holmes & Gardner, 2006, p. 51). Further, there should be no time or location limitations and all people should have access to education through e-learning and an ability to make global connections to foster cultural competency (Holmes & Gardner, 2006, p. 52). Holmes and Gardner (2006) quote the European Commission, a group that expresses, “…e-Learning can promote social integration and inclusion, opening access to learning for people with special needs and those living in difficult circumstances (marginalized groups, migrants, single parents, etc.)” (p. 60). As a society, we will surely fail unless we make e-learning available to everyone. This makes it paramount for instructional designers to address issues of accessibility.

The Science of E-learning Design

During this course, I found myself fascinated by the science behind e-learning design. Instructional designers must be aware of differing perceptions that learners from diverse backgrounds and cultures bring to education. De Bortoli and Maroto (2001) state, “In an increasingly competitiimages-1ve and saturated market, communication needs to be carefully targeted. Few companies have a brand that is powerful enough to generate a quasi uniform perception world-wide” (p. 3). For example, something as simple as color can impact the learning for diverse populations. De Bortoli and Maroto (2001) discuss a plethora of the considerations needed about color choice: different colors have different meanings across the globe, learning will not be transferred if a group does not have the language for certain colors, people from different places prefer different colors, men and women notice colors differently as well as people in different age categories, schizophrenic people do not perceive color in a typical way, nor do the color blind (p. 4-5, 11). One of my students is diagnosed with synesthesia, in which he sees letters, words, and numbers as different colors. His perception during learning is certainly different than someone without synesthesia. These are considerations I started to make during e-learning design that I never thought about before.

E-Learning & My Personal Journey

At the start of this course, I believed that digital media did most of the work when it came to e-learning. I still agree with Reitz (2012) who says that e-learning includes some kind of electronic device or computer and is digital media or software supported (p. 86-7). However, there are so many other components that go into effective e-learning design besides the technology. I decided to use SmartBuilder for my module, but did not realize that the free version used Flash. It was incredibly difficult and time consuming to design the e-learning. Even though I am ending with a product I am proud of, I know that my module can in no way compete with the video games my students play. It will be my personal mission to advocate for better and cheaper design software and a system that is more organized.

Questions Remaining: What do you think is the most important issue facing the future of e-learning? What considerations do you make while designing online instruction?

References

De Bortoli, M. & Maroto, J. (2001). Colours across cultures: Translating colours in interactive marketing communications. Proceedings of the European Languages and the Implementation of Communication and Information Technologies (Elicit) Conference. University of Paisley.

Holmes, B., & Gardner, J. (2006). E-learning: Concepts and practice. London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

Reitz, S. (2012). Improving social competence via e-learning?: The example of human rights education. Frankfurt: Lang, Peter, GmbH, Internationaler Verlag der Wissenschaften. Retrieved from eds.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/ebookviewer/ebook?sid=8651241c-3438-402e-9d19-5257917acdb4%40sessionmgr110&ppid=pp_84&hid=103&vid=0&format=EB.

Wankel, C., & Blessinger, P. (2013). Increasing student engagement and retention in e-learning environments: Web 2.0 and blended learning technologies. Bingley, England: Emerald. Retrieved from eds.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/ebookviewer/ebook?sid=be042b56-bead-47b8-98da-e7bcf53e6b57%40sessionmgr4003&ppid=pp_1&hid=4111&vid=0&format=EB.

The Execution, Change and Quality Management of a Project

Project Execution

Executing the plan refers to carrying out the work you outlined in the project plan. First, the project manager must do quality assurance to make sure the project will meet its objectives efficiently. Then, they acquire and develop a project team (Cox, 2009, p. 169). It is important that they choose skilled people and that they do ongoing team builders to foster cohesion and motivation (Cox, 2009, p. 169). Another crucial step in executiimgresng the plan is communicating project information to stakeholders through status reports so that they are aware of milestones reached and challenges cropping up (Cox, 2009, p. 169). The project manager must manage stakeholder expectations by making sure that deliverables are matching expectations (p. 170). It is a huge responsibility to monitor and control the project by performing integrated change control (approving or denying changes), verifying and controlling the scope, controlling schedule, cost and quality, reporting on performance, monitoring and controlling risk, and administering procurements, but these are necessary steps in carrying out the plan to success (Cox, 2009, p. 170).

Change & Quality ManagementRMQualityAssurance

Incorporating change and quality management increases the odds of project success. English (2015) reinforces that project processes should be managed for quality in order to ensure project success and see improvements in cost, quality, speed, and profitability (p. 3). English (2015) states, “Quality is important because it emphasizes what the customer wants” (p. 3). If the stakeholder needs are not addressed, the value of the project goes down and the project may fail.

According to Creasey and Taylor (2014), active and visible sponsorship of a project is consistently reported as the most important contributor to the success of a project. Project managers can be active and visible by giving regular attention to changes and the need for change management, motivating others to help address change, making effective decisions in reaction to the change, and maintain strong communication about changes (p. 13). The authors of the study found that, “Sponsor effectiveness had a direct impact on whether or not projects met objectives. Projects with extremely effective sponsors met or exceeded objectives more than twice as often as those with ineffective sponsors” (Creasey & Taylor, 2014, p. 13). In addition, a structured approach to change management supports project planning, the definitions of strategies, and the creation of a clear and insightful vision, thus leading to greater quality (Creasey & Taylor, 2014, p. 13). Creasey and Taylor (2014) found that, “…62% of participants that integrated project management and change management met or exceeded project objectives, compared to only 45% of participants that did not integrate” (p. 16). Clearly, managing changes increases quality.

Personal Reflection

One area that is less developed for my project is risk management. In my project plan, I identified risks, but did not expound upon what I would do to solve them. This is an issue, since both of my major risks, should they occur, would mean the failure of the project. My next step will be to create a risk plan and monitor it throughout the project. In the past, I would not have even thought about risks, but now I know how vital it is to make a plan for these proactively as opposed to reactively when it is too late.

Another area I need to develop more is acquiring and developing a project team. I did not account for this at all in my plan, and adding more members to my one-woman team will help me solve some of the potential risks I outlined in the plan. My next step will be to complete a Potential Project Team Members worksheet to detail each person’s role, availability and details. In the past, I tended to favor working on my own. However, since I have my hands full with most aspects of this project, it will benefit me to pull in some other team members to collaborate with, learn from, and share the workload.

To realize the objectives of my project, I will incorporate various change and quality management tools. I will use a change log to document changes and revisions and a meeting agenda to clearly communicate changes. In addition a stoplight chart will be incorporated in the documents for a visual display of tasks completed, ones in progress, and ones needing attention. This will be a quick and efficient way to address changes needed. Also, there will be a measurement plan to track learning and ensure objectives are being met. This, in my opinion, is the most important component of the quality management plan. Finally, I will use a control checklist to consistently monitor and control all processes and keep a clear vision of the big picture.

This website explains various risk management methods:

http://www.brighthubpm.com/risk-management/98003-how-do-you-manage-project-risk-a-look-at-various-approaches/

This article details the 7 greatest contributors to change management success:

http://eds.b.ebscohost.com/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=5bc6a4fe-79cd-4757-86b6-8e8f7191eced%40sessionmgr110&vid=3&hid=103

References

Cox, D.M.T. (2010). Project management skills for instructional designers: A practical guide. Bloomington, IL : iUniverse.

Creasey, T., & Taylor, T. (2014). Seven greatest contributors to change management success. People & Strategy, 37(1), 12-16. Retrieved from http://eds.b.ebscohost.com/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=74ebf7b8-1e20-4487-ac76-a95132f13ac6%40sessionmgr114&vid=20&hid=103.

English, M. (2015). Process management for quality. Process Management For Quality. Research Starters, 1, 1-6. Retrieved from http://eds.b.ebscohost.com/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=74ebf7b8-1e20-4487-ac76-a95132f13ac6%40sessionmgr114&vid=16&hid=103.

Project Planning & Communication

Planning for Success

Cox (2009) tells us that approximately forty percent of project time should be spent during the planning process (p. 62). Spending the right amount of time on the plan is crucial for the success of the project. Allen, Alleyne, Farmer, and McRae (2014) state, “The survey revealed that the Project Management Plan was the most important tool [for project success] since it documents the goals, objectives, and scope of the project” (p. 14). The project manager must know which deliverables will and will not be included in the plan. The purpose of defining the scope is to detail the project’s objectives, deliverables, and requirements (Cox, 2010, p. 67). The project manager must describe what will and will not be included in a project in order to ensure project success and prevent assumptions from destroying the project.

Progressbar40-1

Communication is Key

Cox (2009) stresses the importance of creating appropriate and positive expectations for a project before communication even begins. The project manager can achieve this by projecting credibility, creating a climate, and previewing the content (Cox, 2009, p. 155). In terms of credibility, stakeholders need to know that the project manager has expertise in the field and in the project they are planning. They also need to trust the project manager. All communications, whether written or verbal, need to be professional and free of errors. Finally, information needs to be communicated in a dynamic way (Cox, 2009, p. 156). The project manager must decide what kind of learning climate they want to achieve. Cox (2009) suggests doing an icebreaker or team builder to establish a comfortable and safe environimgresment for learners (p. 156). Finally, it is a best practice to tell the learner what is coming. This way, they can form realistic expectations in their mind and the project manager can avoid confusion.

However, there are still barriers to communication, which include: perception, beliefs, attitude, values, and noise (Cox, 2009, p. 154-5). A person’s perception is their reality, and individuals view events differently. We bring our personal beliefs, attitudes, and values to every event and often times these are biased and subjective. Cox (2014) states, “As this avalanche of internal communications grows, so does the concern of administrators who wonder if what they are trying to communicate to their stakeholders is actually received” (p. 34). Therefore, it is critical that schools understand and develop a culture of effective professional communication.

Personal Reflection

I am learning through this course just how critical the planning stages of a project are. In the past, I have initiated projects without naming stakeholders, or spending sufficient time planning. This has led to a waste of time, money, and energy. One of my biggest takeaways is how incredibly important naming a project’s deliverables and non-deliverables is to having a successful project. Spending the time listing these two categories ensures that no trainee will be confused about project expectations. Defining the scope in detail means the project will be accomplishable.

I anticipate some communication issues during my project for this class. Since I considered them during the planning stages, I will be able to address them effectively. Cox (2014) gives some great suggestions for meaningful communication during a project, which include: evaluating your own strengths and weaknesses, analyzing stakeholders, having a clear purpose, managing your messages, building credibility, seeking surprise, analyzing delivery modes, keeping communication simple, being truthful, and making a plan for communication ahead of time (p. 35-6). Since I am the project manager I will have to be aware of my own weaknesses in terms of communicating information. I will also have to know my stakeholders so that the training is effective.

This website provides scope statement directions, examples, and helpful links:
http://www.brighthubpm.com/project-planning/57950-example-and-evaluation-of-project-scope-statements/

This website gives useful tips to help you avoid resistance to technology projects:
https://www.bdc.ca/EN/articles-tools/technology/invest-technology/Pages/how-overcome-resistance-your-tech-project.aspx?caId=tabs-3

References

Allen, M., Alleyne, D., Farmer, C., McRae, A., & Turner, C. (2014). A framework for project success. Journal Of Information Technology & Economic Development, 5(2), 1-17.

Cox, A. (2014). Increasing purposeful communication in the workplace: Two school-district models. Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin, 80(3), 34-38.

Cox, D. (2010). Project management skills for instructional designers: A practical guide. Bloomington, IN: iUniverse, Inc.

E-learning and Web 2.0’s Positive Impact on Instructional Designers, Teachers, & Scholars

E-learning is learning that occurs through the use of electronic media. I agree with Reitz (2012) who says that e-learning includes some kind of electronic device or computer and is digital media or images-1software supported (p. 86-7). If e-learning is the destination, then Web 2.0 can be considered the vehicle to get there. Web 2.0 includes technologies such as blogs, wikis, and social networking sites. Wankel and Blessinger (2013) assert, “Whereas Web 1.0 is considered a content-centric paradigm, Web 2.0 is considered a social-centric paradigm” (p. 3). Through the creation of e-learning activities using Web 2.0 technologies, instructional designers, teachers, and students all experience a huge pay off.

First, instructional designers are able to access many more resources and make learning more engaging for students. They are able to utilize social bookmarking so that they can organize websites and resources online and share them with others (yearn2learn4ever, 2011). Teachers are also able to share r2590452226_7cfc3057b8_oesources with others and collaborate with people across the globe. They can connect with parents more effectively and have information on their students in real time (yearn2learn4ever, 2011). Students are more engaged because the technology in the classroom is an extension of the technology they use in their every day lives. Their attention is captured by all the design elements of Web 2.0, such as color, video, etc. Web 2.0 taps into multiple learning styles and students can ask questions at any time. The most empowering aspect of it is that students are the content creators, thus giving them a choice and voice in their learning. Web 2.0 and e-learning make designing, teaching, and learning better for all groups.

In my environment, we are ahead of the game when it comes to access to e-learning resources and Web 2.0 technologies. My school has a one-to-one laptop ratio, Smartboards in every classroom, a 3D printer and scanner, a digital book loaning process, and a host of other technological resources. Coskie and Hornof (2013) quote the International Reading Association’s position statement, which states, “To be fully literate in today’s world, students must become proficient in the new literacies of 21st century technologies. As a result, literacy educators have a responsibility to effectively integrate these new technologies into the curriculum, preparing students for the literacy future they deserve” (p. 58). My school, even though our use of technology is still developing, has been able to educate a population of diverse learners successfully. We are able to target multiple learning styles through the use of digital resources such as videos, sounds, and images. Many classes reach the highest level of collaboration through the use of social media, in which students and teachers alike can share ideas with people all over the globe. Students, regardless of socioeconomic status, have access to technology and Internet connection. Denton (2012) argues that cloud computing technologies such as Google Docs, “…have the potential to enhance instructional methods predicated on constructivism and cooperative learning” (p. 34). I have seen this idea come to fruition in my classroom where students become active rather than passive in their learning and work collaboratively instead of in isolation. I have no doubt that blended and online learning trump solely face-to-face learning by far.Web_Literacy_Map_v1.10

Which specific Web 2.0 technologies have you found success with in the classroom?

Click here for links to teachers’ favorite Web 2.0 tools:

https://www.edsurge.com/n/2013-08-21-teachers-favored-web-2-0-tools

Watch this video for a student’s point of view on the importance of digital citizenship classes:

References

Coskie, T. L., & Hornof, M. M. (2013). E-BEST Principles: Infusing Technology Into the Writing Workshop. Reading Teacher, 67(1), 54-58. doi:10.1002/TRTR.1189.

Denton, D. (2012). Enhancing instruction through constructivism, cooperative learning, and cloud computing. Techtrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 56(4), 34-41. doi: 10.1007/s11528-012-0585-1.

Reitz, S. (2012). Improving social competence via e-learning?: The example of human rights education. Frankfurt: Lang, Peter, GmbH, Internationaler Verlag der Wissenschaften. Retrieved from eds.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/ebookviewer/ebook?sid=8651241c-3438-402e-9d19-5257917acdb4%40sessionmgr110&ppid=pp_84&hid=103&vid=0&format=EB.

Wankel, C., & Blessinger, P. (2013). Increasing student engagement and retention in e-learning environments: Web 2.0 and blended learning technologies. Bingley, England: Emerald. Retrieved from eds.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/ebookviewer/ebook?sid=be042b56-bead-47b8-98da-e7bcf53e6b57%40sessionmgr4003&ppid=pp_1&hid=4111&vid=0&format=EB.

yearn2learn4ever. (2011). Web 2.0 technologies for educators [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=497wsZ0vSsQ.